3 Reasons to Build Your Deck With Locally Sourced Timber

If you’re considering added a deck or timber floorboards to your home, then chances are good you’ve already thought about how you want it to look, how big you want your deck to be, how many rooms you are planning to cover and whether you want to use stain or paint to give it just the right colour.

However, what you may not have thought about is where your timber is coming from beyond, “aisle 7 down at the hardware store.”

Locally sourced timber is the way to go, for a number of reasons. Some of the biggest ones are…

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Your Timber is Readily Available

When you get timber that comes from your local area, you can get what you need when you need it. There’s no waiting for a shipment to be sent from the other side of the world, and as such there are no transportation delays or costs to figure in when it comes time to make your purchase.

More Eco-Friendly

If you’re going to buy timber to build a deck or lay timber floorboards, then it’s important to consider the long-term impact of that decision, and how it alters your home’s carbon footprint.

If you buy timber that’s locally sourced, then you know where it’s coming from. You can examine the forestry policies of the local providers, and make sure that when you make a purchase that it’s going to support an operation that plans for sustainability.

A Piece of Your Local Land

There’s a special feeling you get standing out on your own deck and looking over your own little piece of the world. Knowing that your deck came from a similar landscape can make it feel that much more like it belongs on your property.

Not only that but by knowing its history, and being able to state with authority where it came from, it might even add that much additional value to your home over and above the construction of the deck itself.

Narangba Timbers sources much of its timber from local Australian supplies. Hardwood timbers including Ironbark, Spotted Gum, Blackbutt and Kwila / Merbau and softwoods such as pine from local pine plantations.

Posted in Jack's Blog, State Of Timber